May 5, 2011—May 6, 2011: Blumenthal and Clinton worry about the French government developing business ties with the Libyan rebels.

On May 5, 2011, Sid Blumenthal emails Clinton with a warning about a “French economic grab” in Libya. With the rebels likely to eventually take over the oil-rich country due to NATO air support, Blumenthal worries that the French government is establishing strong ties with the rebel Transitional National Council (TNC). The French government is sending medical and humanitarian supplies to the rebels, and also having them meet with French business leaders, including oil company executives.

The next day, Clinton emails Blumenthal back, saying, “Just met w TNC again, but signed no contracts!” (US Department of State, 1/29/2016)

July 14, 2011: Blumenthal tells Clinton about a company he’s invested in helping Libya’s rebels when he would need Clinton’s approval.

Major General David Grange (Credit: Osprey Global Solutions)

Major General David Grange (Credit: Osprey Global Solutions)

Libya is in the middle of a civil war which lasts most of 2011. Sid Blumenthal emails Clinton about a security company called Osprey Global Solutions, headed by retired Army Major General David Grange. Blumenthal tells Clinton about Osprey’s attempt to get a contract to give “field medical help, military training, organize supplies and logistics” to Libyan rebels currently fighting Colonel Muammar el-Qaddafi.

He adds, “Grange can train their forces and he has drawn up a plan for taking [the Libyan capitol of] Tripoli… This is a private contract. It does not involve NATO. It puts Americans in a central role without being direct battle combatants. The TNC [the rebel Transitional National Council] wants to demonstrate that they are pro-US. They see this as a significant way to do that. They are enthusiastic about this arrangement.” Furthermore, “Tyler, Cody, and I acted as honest brokers, putting this arrangement together through a series of connections, linking the Libyans to Osprey and keeping it moving.”

Blumenthal is a private citizen, journalist, and Clinton Foundation employee at the time. “Tyler” is Tyler Drumheller, who worked for the CIA until 2005. “Cody” is Cody Shearer, a longtime friend of Clintons. Blumenthal, Drumheller, and Shearer formed a business relationship to help Osprey. Clinton’s State Department would have to give its approval to a deal between this company and the Libyan rebels. (Yahoo, 10/8/2015) (US Department of State, 1/7/2016)

July 15, 2011: The US officially recognizes the rebels as the legitimate rulers of Libya.

Clinton meets with TNC Executive Bureau Chairman Mahmoud Jibril on July 15, 2011. Credit: US Embassy of Libya)

Clinton meets with TNC Executive Bureau Chairman Mahmoud Jibril on July 15, 2011. Credit: US Embassy of Libya)

Clinton announces that the US recognizes the rebel Transitional National Council (TNC) as “the legitimate governing authority for Libya,” and says long-time Libyan leader Muammar el-Qaddafi’s government “no longer [has] legitimate authority.” The rebels are still fighting a civil war in Libya, supported by the US and NATO, but are gaining ground against el-Qaddafi’s forces. Clinton says US recognition should help the rebels gain more funding. (US Department of State, 7/15/2011)

August 24, 2011: The Libyan rebels agree to get military training by the US company backed by Blumenthal.

Top portion of the Osprey Global Solution Memorandum of Understanding with the Transitional National Council. (Credit: Gawker)

Top portion of the Osprey Global Solution Memorandum of Understanding with the Transitional National Council. (Credit: Gawker)

The rebel political leadership Transitional National Council (TNC) signs a memorandum of understanding with Osprey Global Solutions, the US company that Clinton confidant Sid Blumenthal has partnered in. Osprey agrees to assist the Libyan rebels with training in intelligence, weaponry, and tactics. However, it is unclear if the training ever takes place, because the rebels lack money. (Gawker, 3/27/2015)

October 20, 2011: el-Qaddafi is killed, ending the Libyan civil war.

Colonel Muammar el-Qaddafi (Credit: European Press Agency)

Colonel Muammar el-Qaddafi (Credit: European Press Agency)

Long-time Libyan leader Muammar el-Qaddafi is killed in his last remaining stronghold of Sirte, Libya. He is beaten to death by an angry mob of rebel Libyans. (Reuters, 10/20/2011)

On October 24, The Transitional National Council (TNC), the political leadership of the Libyan rebels, declares Libya liberated and the civil war over. (Al Jazeera, 10/24/2011)