September 20, 2007: If Hillary becomes president, Bill Clinton would disclose future donors to the Clinton Foundation, but not past ones.

On September 20, 2007, with Hillary Clinton running for president, her husband Bill Clinton says of his work with the Clinton Foundation and his presidential library, “Now we don’t have to publish all of our donors, for example, and if Hillary became president, I think there would be all these questions about whether people would try to win favor with her by giving money to me. You know it wouldn’t work, and I don’t think they would. Still, there are legitimate questions.”  (The Economist, 9/20/2007)

Seven days later, he says, “If she becomes president…I will disclose all the donors to our library and activities. For the people that have already given me money, I don’t think I should disclose it unless there is some conflict of which I am aware, and there is not.” (The Washington Post, 9/28/2007)

January 21, 2009: President Obama pledges to increase government transparency.

President Obama delivers a speech after being sworn in on January 21, 2009. (Credit: Jim Young / Reuters)

President Obama delivers a speech after being sworn in on January 21, 2009. (Credit: Jim Young / Reuters)

During his swearing-in ceremony, Obama says, “Let me say it as simply as I can. Transparency and the rule of law will be the touchstones of this presidency.”

He adds, “Starting today, every agency and department should know that this administration stands on the side not of those who seek to withhold information, but those who seek to make it known. […] The Freedom of Information Act [FOIA] is perhaps the most powerful instrument we have for making our government honest and transparent, and of holding it accountable. And I expect members of my administration not simply to live up to the letter but also the spirit of this law.” (The White House, 1/21/2009)

In November 2016, Slate will comment, “Needless to say, the agencies have not taken this order seriously, nor has Obama pressured or prodded them to do so. Many crises crowded his agenda soon after his inauguration, leaving the cause of government openness on the back burner, if not in the freezer.” (Slate, 11/2/2016)

July 12, 2011: Clinton’s public comments on transparency contradict her personal practices.

Clinton speaks to the Open Government Partnership on July 12, 2011. (Credit: Open Government Partnership}

Clinton speaks to the Open Government Partnership on July 12, 2011. (Credit: Open Government Partnership}

Clinton gives a speech to inaugurate the Open Government Partnership, an international initiative to promote government transparency. “When a government hides its work from public view, hands out jobs and money to political cronies, administers unequal justice, looks away as corrupt bureaucrats and businessmen enrich themselves at the people’s expense, that government is failing its citizens. And most importantly, that government is failing to earn and hold the trust of its people. And that lack of trust, in a world of instantaneous communication, means that the very fabric of society begins to fray and the foundation of governmental legitimacy begins to crumble.”

In 2015, Danielle Brian, the executive director of the nonpartisan Project On Government Oversight (POGO), will say that Clinton’s comments “demonstrate extraordinary hypocrisy given that while Clinton was giving this speech she had created essentially a second set of books where her communications were not being captured for the National Archives [and Records Administration (NARA)].” Furthermore, keeping all of her emails out of reach “undermines the whole point of the Open Government Partnership.” (US Department of State, 7/12/2011) (Bloomberg News, 3/5/2015)

April 2013—March 2015: Hillary Clinton is paid more than $21 million for 92 speeches given between April 2013 and 2015.

That averages $235,000 per speech. The speeches are given between the end of her time as secretary of state in February 2013 and the formal start of her 2016 presidential campaign in April 2015.

In 2016, Clinton will comment, “Time and time again, by innuendo, by insinuation, there is this attack that…really comes down to, you know, anybody who ever took donations or speaking fees from any interest group has to be bought. And I just absolutely reject that…” (CNN, 2/6/2016)

March 2, 2015: Clinton spokesperson Nick Merrill incorrectly claims that Clinton’s email practices followed “both the letter and spirit of the rules.”

Nick Merrill (Credit: Skidmore College)

Nick Merrill (Credit: Skidmore College)

Merrill’s comment appears in the March 2, 2015 New York Times story revealing that Clinton used a private email account when she was secertary of state. He won’t say why she did this. (The New York Times, 3/2/2015)

However, on March 12, 2015, Douglas Cox, a professor who focuses on records preservation laws, says: “While Clinton may have technical arguments for why she complied with [the various] rules that have been discussed in the news, the argument that Clinton complied with the letter and spirit of the law is unsustainable.” (Politifact, 3/12/2015)

In May 2016, the State Department’s inspector general will conclude that department officials “did not—and would not—approve her exclusive reliance on a personal email account to conduct Department business.” Her daily use of a private email account for work matters is also determined to be in violation of department rules. (US Department of State, 5/25/2016)

March 3, 2015: The State Department falsely asserts Clinton’s email practices were not prohibited.

Marie Harf (Credit: public domain)

Marie Harf (Credit: public domain)

State Department spokesperson Marie Harf defends Clinton’s email arrangement, saying that she “was following what had been the practice of previous secretaries.” She claims “it was not prohibited at the time, [and] is not prohibited now.” She also says, “I was a little surprised—although maybe I shouldn’t have been—by some of the breathless reporting coming out last night.” (US Department of State, 3/3/2015) 

Some of Harf’s comments are clearly untrue, as the department’s former chief legal adviser John Bellinger points out in an email to department officials later in the same day. (US Department of State, 5/31/2016) (The Daily Caller, 6/7/2016) 

Not until a State Department inspector general’s report in May 2016 will it be revealed that Clinton’s email practices were clearly prohibited at the time and differed significantly from the practices of previous secretaries. (US Department of State, 5/25/2016)

March 10, 2015: Hillary’s claim of private email correspondence with her husband Bill is contradicted by him.

Matt McKenna (Credit: The Associated Press)

Matt McKenna (Credit: The Associated Press)

In a press conference at the United Nations, one reason Hillary Clinton gives for deleting some of the emails from her private server is that they “contain[ed] personal communications from my husband and me.”

However, on the same day she says this, Matt McKenna, spokesperson for Bill Clinton, asserts that Bill still doesn’t use email himself. Although he does use Twitter sometimes, he has only sent two emails in his life, and both of them were when he was president in the 1990s. (The Daily Telegraph, 3/10/2015) (The Wall Street Journal, 3/10/2015)

April 26, 2015: The Clinton Foundation admits mistakes.

Maura Pally (Credit: The Clinton Foundation)

Maura Pally (Credit: The Clinton Foundation)

The foundation’s acting CEO Maura Pally says, “Yes, we made mistakes, as many organizations of our size do, but we are acting quickly to remedy them, and have taken steps to ensure they don’t happen in the future.” Her comments come in the wake of numerous news reports about conflicts of interest and lack of transparency in the foundation.

Many of the reports are based on the book Clinton Cash by conservative author Peter Schweizer. According to CNN, Schweizer says he doesn’t “have ‘direct evidence’ of ethical misconduct, but [says] the pattern he uncovered should raise eyebrows and trigger an investigation.” (CNN, 4/27/2015)

Pally was a deputy assistant secretary under Clinton at State Department. 

May 4, 2015: Former President Bill Clinton responds to criticism of the Clinton Foundation and his large speaking fees.

Bill and Hillary Clinton in Manhattan, New York, on January 6, 2015. (Credit: Carlo Allegri / Reuters)

Bill and Hillary Clinton in Manhattan, New York, on January 6, 2015. (Credit: Carlo Allegri / Reuters)

“There is no doubt in my mind that we have never done anything knowingly inappropriate in terms of taking money to influence any kind of American government policy.” He says he won’t stop being paid for giving speeches. “I gotta pay our bills. And I also give a lot of it to the foundation every year.” He also says, “People should draw their own conclusions. I’m not in politics. All I’m saying is the idea that there’s one set of rules for us and another set for everybody else is true.” (NBC News, 5/4/2015)

The next day, Politico reports that his “I gotta pay our bills” comment strikes some Democrats as “off-key” and worrisome, given the vast wealth the Clintons have. (Politico, 5/5/2015)

June 10, 2015: Former President Bill Clinton says that he won’t stop giving paid speeches while his wife Hillary is running for president.

But when asked if he’ll keep giving paid speeches if she becomes the next president, he says, “No, I don’t think so.” In 2014 alone, Bill and Hillary were paid $25 million for 104 paid speeches, and such speeches have raised conflict of interest questions. Asked if he will continue to work for the Clinton Foundation if Hillary becomes president, he says, “That will be not an easy decision should she be elected president. She will have to decide…[We] will have to talk about it.” (CNN, 6/11/2015)

June 14, 2015: Bill Clinton says he and his wife Hillary don’t know if there were conflicts of interest with the Clinton Foundation.

Jake Tapper (Credit: CNN)

Jake Tapper (Credit: CNN)

CNN journalist Jake Tapper asks Bill Clinton, “I think a lot of people might say, OK, you say there’s no evidence that anything was done for [donors to the Clinton Foundation], but can you really say that these companies, these wealthy individuals, these governments, none of them sought anything? I mean, some of them did have business before the State Department.”

Clinton replies, “I don’t know. […] I know of no example. But you never know what people’s motives are.”

Tapper then says to him, “You say you don’t know if anybody sought any favor.”

Clinton responds, “No, and I don’t think Hillary would know either. She was pretty busy those years. And I never saw her study a list of my contributors or…and I had no idea who was doing business before the State Department.” (CNN, 6/14/2015)

June 14, 2015: Obama’s former chief of staff Bill Daley says he never knew Clinton used a private server.

Bill Daley (Credit: NBC / Meet the Press)

Bill Daley (Credit: NBC / Meet the Press)

Daley was White House chief of staff to President Obama from January 2011 to January 2012. He says, “Obviously, it was something that I did not know and others didn’t…”

A reporter presses him, “So you had no idea at all that there was a server over at the Clintons’ residence?”

Daley responds, “No. How would I know that?” (NBC News, 6/14/2015)

July 24, 2015: Many of Clinton’s emails contained classified information when they were sent, not just retroactively.

Intelligence Community Inspector General Charles McCullough and State Department Inspector General Steve Linick issue a joint statement about their inquiry into Clinton’s emails. The statement says that out of a random sample of 40 of Clinton’s emails, Linick found four emails containing information that should have been classified at the time they were sent. “These emails were not retroactively classified by the State Department; rather these emails contained classified information when they were generated and, according to [Intelligence Community] classification officials, that information remains classified today. This classified information should never have been transmitted via an unclassified personal system.” (US Department of State, 7/24/2015) 

One email will later be declassified by the State Department, and the department will dispute the classification of another one. (The Washington Post, 3/27/2016)

July 25, 2015: Clinton says, “I am confident that I never sent nor received any information that was classified at the time it was sent and received.”

This is a shift from previous statements where she claimed her emails didn’t contain any classified material at all. (The Washington Post, 8/14/2015) Clinton also says that very few issues have emerged in her publicly released emails so far. “We’re talking about four or fewer.” However, the Wall Street Journal notes, “The inspector general has reviewed only about 40 of Mrs. Clinton’s emails, though, suggesting that more secret or top-secret information could be found in the thousands… that remain.” (The Wall Street Journal, 7/25/2015)

August 8, 2015: Clinton writes under oath that she has provided the State Department all of her work-related emails that were on her personal email account she used while secretary of state.

Her short statement includes this sentence: “I have directed that all my emails on clintonemail.com in my custody that were or potentially were federal records be provided to the Department of State, and on information and belief, this has been done.”

150808HillaryOath

A sample of the document Clinton signed on August 8, 2015. (Credit: Politico)

That statement is a result of a Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) lawsuit brought by Judicial Watch against the State Department. Additionally, Clinton mentions in her statement that her top aide Huma Abedin also had an email account on her clintonemail.com server that “was used at times for government business,” but another top aide, Cheryl Mills, did not. (The New York Times, 8/10/2015) (Politico, 8/8/2015)

One month later, some more of Clinton’s work emails from her time as secretary of state will be discovered by the Defense Department. (The New York Times, 9/25/2015)

August 18, 2015: Clinton says her email scandal is largely a debate between government agencies over classification protocols.

In a press conference, she claims, “This has nothing to do with me. This has nothing to do with the fact that my account was personal. It’s the process by which the government, and sometimes in disagreement between various agencies of the government, make decisions about what can and cannot be disclosed.” (The Guardian, 9/9/2015)

September 7, 2015: Clinton says she has nothing to apologize for regarding her email scandal.

Clinton speaks during a campaign stop in Hampton, Illinois on September 7, 2015. (Credit: Brian C. Frank / Reuters)

Clinton speaks during a campaign stop in Hampton, Illinois on September 7, 2015. (Credit: Brian C. Frank / Reuters)

In an interview, Clinton is directly asked if she will apologize, and does not do so. Instead, she claims, “What I did was allowed. It was allowed by the State Department. The State Department has confirmed that. […] It was fully above board. Everybody in the government with whom I emailed knew that I was using a personal email.”

The Washington Post notes, “As phrased, Clinton sidesteps the question of whether people knew she was exclusively using a private system.” (The Washington Post, 9/10/2015) (NBC News, 9/8/2016) 

However, a May 2016 State Department inspector general’s report will conclude that nobody in government ever approved of her exclusive use of a personal email account or a personal server, and had the right authorities been told, they would not have approved. Clinton will then comment, “I thought it was allowed.” (The Associated Press, 5/27/2016)

September 27, 2015: Clinton denies she was trying to hide her email from investigators and the public.

Carrie Johnson (Credit: Doby Photography / NPR)

Carrie Johnson (Credit: Doby Photography / NPR)

Journalist Chuck Todd asks Clinton, “Republicans have been coming after you for years. You might have been running for president in the future. And you wanted to make it a little more difficult for congressional investigators to subpoena your government emails and a little more difficult for Freedom of Information Act [FOIA] requests. Is that it, fair theory or no?”

Clinton replies, “It’s totally ridiculous. That never crossed my mind.”

NPR justice correspondent Carrie Johnson later comments, “[T]here’s a reason she might have decided to answer that way. […] Clinton is talking to two audiences here —voters and investigators. And when it comes to avoiding subpoenas and taking steps to avoid subpoenas, lawyers will tell you there’s an important law Congress passed in 2002 after the Enron scandal. That law makes it a crime to get rid of documents in anticipation of an investigation by the Justice Department or by Congress—a crime called obstruction of justice.” (National Public Radio, 9/30/2015)

September 27, 2015: Clinton apologizes again for making a “mistake” using a private email account and server.

In an interview, Clinton says of the presidential election, “This is a contest, and it’s fair game for people to raise whatever they choose to raise… you know they’re not giving this job away. Of course I take responsibility. It was my choice. It was a mistake back when I did it, and I’m trying to do the best I can to answer all of the questions that people have.” (The Washington Post, 9/27/2015)

September 27, 2015: Clinton claims she did not have any work-related emails regarding the Clinton Foundation while secretary of state.

Clinton on Meet The Press, September 27, 2015. (Credit: NBC)

Clinton on Meet The Press, September 27, 2015. (Credit: NBC)

Clinton is asked by journalist Chuck Todd on Meet The Press about her decision to delete 31,000 emails because they were allegedly personal in nature: “I’m just curious, would anything having to do with the Clinton Foundation, would that have been personal or work?”

Clinton replies, “Well, it would depend. You know, I did not communicate with the foundation. Other people in the State Department did. In accordance with the rules that had been adopted.”

Then Todd asks, “So any of these deleted emails are not going to be foundation-related at all?”

Clinton responds, “Well, they might be, you know, ‘There’s going to be a meeting,’ or, ‘There’s this.’ But not anything that relates to the work of the State Department. That was handled by, you know, the professionals and others in the State Department.” (NBC News, 9/27/2015)

September 27, 2015: Clinton alleges it is “totally ridiculous” she used a private server to hide her emails from later public scrutiny.

Clinton is asked if she used her private email server at least in part to avoid scrutiny from future Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) requests or Congressional subpoenas. She responds, “It’s totally ridiculous. That never crossed my mind.” She calls the suggestion “another conspiracy theory.” She says she assumed her emails would be available because she mostly was emailing to other officials who were using government email addresses. (The Wall Street Journal, 9/27/2015) (The Washington Post, 9/27/2015)

However, in 2000, she made a private comment about possibly using email that was recorded on video: “As much as I’ve been investigated and all of that, you know, why would I? […] Why would I ever want to do email? Can you imagine?” (ABC News, 3/6/2015)

September 27, 2015: Clinton cannot explain the discovery of some emails she didn’t turn over.

Clinton claimed that the first time she used her email address from her private server was on March 18, 2009, so all the emails she has handed over come from after that date. But in the wake of reports that some emails were found from her address two months earlier, Clinton is asked to explain the discrepancy.

She says, “There was a transition period. You know, I wasn’t that focused on my email.”

She adds that the server existed in her house for years before she added her account, and “it apparently took a little time to do that. And so there was about a month where I didn’t have everything already on the server, and we [later] went back, tried to, you know, recover whatever we could recover. And I think it’s also fair to say that, you know, there are some things about this that I just can’t control. I am by no means a technical expert. I relied on people who were.”

The New York Times later comments about her remarks, “The issue of whether Mrs. Clinton has been forthcoming about when she began using the personal account…is only the latest email-related question to distract from her policy positions and message during her presidential campaign.” (The New York Times, 9/27/2009)

September 29, 2015:: Republican Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy says that the House Benghazi Committee is part of a Republican “strategy to fight and win.”

Senator Kevin McCarthy (Credit: The Harvard Institute of Politics)

Senator Kevin McCarthy (Credit: The Harvard Institute of Politics)

In an interview, he adds, “Everybody thought Hillary Clinton was unbeatable, right? But we put together a Benghazi special committee, a select committee. What are her numbers today? Her numbers are dropping. Why? Because she’s untrustable. But no one would have known any of that had happened, had we not fought.” McCarthy’s comments are notable since he is a Republican and the committee is run by Republicans. (The Washington Post, 9/30/2015)

October 12, 2015: Cheryl Mills says Clinton’s use of a private email server should have been done differently.

Clinton’s former chief of staff Cheryl Mills is interviewed by the Washington Post. She says regarding Clinton’s use of a private server, “gosh, if you could do it again, you’d just do it again differently…” She says, “I wish there had been a lot more thought and deliberation around it,” but she was not involved in its set-up or discussions about it. She also doesn’t recall having discussions about security vulnerabilities. (The Washington Post, 10/12/2015)

October 19, 2015: A Congressperson says a President Clinton could be quickly impeached due to her email scandal.

Representative Mo Brooks (Credit: Public Domain)

Representative Mo Brooks (Credit: Public Domain)

Representative Mo Brooks (R) says that his concern with Clinton’s use of a private email server is “how many lives she put at risk by violating all rules of law that are designed to protect America’s top secret and classified information from falling into the hands of our geopolitical foes who then might use that information to result in the deaths of Americans. […] [S]he will be a unique president if she is elected by the public next November [2016], because the day she’s sworn in is the day that she’s subject to impeachment because she has committed high crimes and misdemeanors.” (The Huffington Post, 10/19/2015)

A few days later, Clinton reacts to the impeachment threat: “It’s just laughable! It’s so totally ridiculous. […] It perhaps is good politics with… the most intense, extreme part of [the Republican] base.” (Politico, 10/23/2015)

October 22, 2015: FBI Director James Comey comments about the FBI’s Clinton investigation.

FBI Director James Comey testifying before a Congressional committee on October 22, 2015. (Credit: C-Span)

FBI Director James Comey testifying before a Congressional committee on October 22, 2015. (Credit: C-Span)

In a Congressional hearing, he says, “The FBI is working on a referral given to us by inspectors general in connection with former Secretary Clinton’s use of a private email server. As you also know about the FBI, we don’t talk about our investigations while we are doing them. This is one I am following very closely and get briefed on regularly. I’m confident we have the people and resources to do it in the way I believe we do all our work, which is promptly, professionally and independently.” (The Washington Post, 10/22/2015)

December 9, 2015: President Obama is not being briefed about the FBI’s Clinton investigation.

Senator Jeff Cornyn (Credit: US Congress)

Senator Jeff Cornyn (Credit: US Congress)

Speaking to FBI Director James Comey in a Congressional meeting, Senator Jeff Cornyn (R) expresses his concern about political pressure that could be put on the FBI’s investigation into Clinton’s emails and server. Cornyn then asks, “Does the President get briefings on ongoing investigations by the FBI like this?”

Comey replies, “No.”

Then Cornyn asks, “So he would have no way of knowing what the status of the FBI investigation is?”

Comey replies, “Certainly not from briefings from the FBI.” (The Daily Caller, 12/9/2015)

January 21, 2016: Clinton denies news reports that she received top secret information in her emails.

Clinton poses with supporters during a rally on January 21, 2016, in Vinton, Iowa. (Jae C. Hong / The Association Press)

Clinton poses with supporters during a rally on January 21, 2016, in Vinton, Iowa. (Jae C. Hong / The Association Press)

While greeting potential voters on the campaign trail in Iowa, Clinton is asked by a private citizen about her email scandal: “How do you plan to sidestep the reality that you are sending secure, SAP [special access program] emails on your private, unsecured server?”

Clinton replies, “You know what, it’s not true. It’s not true. I never sent or received—”

The citizen interrupts to ask, “You never received top secret information on your private server?”

Clinton responds, “No, no—I did not.” (Politico, 1/21/2016) 

Recent news reports said that Clinton had received emails containing “top secret” information, including information about above top secret/special access programs. (The New York Times, 1/19/2016)

January 31, 2016: Clinton suggests that even her “top secret” emails should be made public.

In the wake of revelations that 22 of Clinton’s emails have been retroactively classified “top secret,” she says, “Let’s just get it out. Let’s see what it is and let the American people draw their own conclusions. […] I think it’s pretty clear [the Republicans are] grasping at straws…” (CNN, 1/31/2016)

John Schindler, a former National Security Agency (NSA) counterintelligence officer, comments that “this is pure political theater: she surely knows that the emails are not going to be released on security grounds anytime soon, probably not for several decades, at least.” (The New York Observer, 2/1/2016)

January 31, 2016: Clinton dodges a question about the irrelevance of classification markings.

George Stephanopoulos (Credit: ABC News)

George Stephanopoulos (Credit: ABC News)

ABC News journalist George Stephanopoulos asks Clinton, “You know, you’ve said many times that [your] emails were not marked classified. The non-disclosure agreement you signed as secretary of state says that that’s really not that relevant. It says classified information is marked or unmarked classified and that all of you are trained to treat all of that sensitively and should know the difference.”

Clinton replies, “Well of course and that’s exactly what I did. I take classified information very seriously. You know, you can’t get information off the classified system in the State Department to put on an unclassified system, no matter what that system is. We were very specific about that. And when you receive information, of course, there has to be some markings, some indication that someone down the chain thought that this was classified and that was not the case.”

The Washington Post reviews the exchange and says that Clinton’s answer is “only half of the story. Even without markings, officials are supposed to recognize that information passed through an unclassified system might be deemed as classified and should take steps to protect it.” Furthermore, Clinton did sign a non-disclosure agreement legally obligating her to do just that. (The Washington Post, 3/4/2016)

February 1, 2016: Clinton comments on recent news reports suggesting the FBI’s Clinton investigation is gaining momentum.

She says, “It means the people are selectively leaking and making comments with no basis. We need to let this inquiry run its course, get it resolved.” She adds, “There is nothing new and I think the facts are quite helpful here, it’s a little bit like what the Republicans and others have tried to do with respect to Benghazi.” (Politico, 2/1/2016)

March 30, 2016: Clinton says the Clinton Foundation will continue if she is elected president.

Clinton on the Rachel Maddow Show on March 30, 2016. (Credit: MSNBC)

Clinton on the Rachel Maddow Show on March 30, 2016. (Credit: MSNBC)

Clinton is interviewed by MSNBC political commentator Rachel Maddow. Maddow asks her, “I think it is not unreasonable to suspect that people may give donations to the Clinton Foundation hoping that they will favorably influence your opinion toward them, as a presidential candidate, or eventually as president if you’re elected. […] Is there a case to be made, an ethical case to be made that the Clinton Foundation and the [Clinton] Global Initiative should essentially be wound down as a family foundation while you run for president?”

Clinton disagrees. She describes the charity work of the foundation in detail, then says: “So, I think the answer is transparency. And there is no doubt that there will be complete transparency about donations.” (Newsweek, 3/30/2016)

April 6, 2016: Comey says he’s staying close to the Clinton email investigation.

After a public speech, FBI Director James Comey is asked to comment about the state of the FBI’s investigation into Clinton’s email scandal.

He responds, “I’ve stayed close to that investigation” to ensure that it’s done competently and independently. He adds that it’s important that “we have the resources, the technology, the people, and that there’s no outside influence. So, if I talk about an investigation while it’s going on, there’s a risk that I’ll compromise both the reality and the perception that it’s done honestly, competently, and independently. So, I’m going to say no comment to that.” (Politico, 4/6/2016)

April 28, 2016: Attorney General Loretta Lynch says the Justice Department hasn’t set a deadline to finish the FBI’s Clinton investigation because doing so would hurt its effectiveness.

Asked in an interview if voters deserve to know the result of the investigation before the Democratic primaries are over, Lynch replies, “People have to have confidence that we treat every case the same, no matter whose last name is involved, no matter how much publicity it gets. We don’t make predictions on the time because that essentially cuts off the independence of that and it cuts off the thoroughness.” (Bloomberg News, 4/28/2016)

April 30, 2016: Bill Clinton calls his wife’s email scandal a partisan “game.”

Bill Clinton gesticulates as he calls his wife's email scandal a "game," in Kokomo, Indiana, on April 30, 2016. (Credit: public domain)

Bill Clinton gesticulates as he calls his wife’s email scandal a “game,” in Kokomo, Indiana, on April 30, 2016. (Credit: public domain)

In a campaign speech, Bill Clinton defends his wife Hillary’s behavior in her email scandal. “Now what are we supposed to do? You said you want to see [her emails]? She said, ‘Fine, have them.’ They said, ‘Oh no, some of them should have been secret.’ Now, you think about this when you go home. If you’re driving in a 50-mile an hour zone, and a police officer pulls you over when you’re driving 40, and says, ‘I’m sorry, I’ve got to give you a ticket, because you know the speed limit here should be 35 and you should have known it.’ So everybody’s all breathless about this. Look, this is a game.”

LawNewz note that his speed limit analogy “fails, miserably,” because Hillary Clinton was trained and legally obliged to identify classified information whether it was clearly marked as such or not. (LawNewz, 5/1/2016)

May 2, 2016: The State Department changes its policy on when foreign intelligence should be considered classified.

State Department legislative liaison Julia Frifield sends a letter to the Senate indicating an apparent change in what information the State Department considers properly classified. The vast majority of redactions in Clinton’s emails are for foreign government information, to which Frifield refers as “FGI.”

Frifield writes, “Although the unauthorized release of FGI is presumed to cause harm to the national security—thereby qualifying as Confidential [level] classified information, department officials of necessity routinely receive such information through unclassified channels. For example, diplomats engage in meetings with counterparts in open settings, have phone calls with foreign contacts over unsecure lines, and email with and about foreign counterparts via unclassified systems. Diplomats could not conduct diplomacy if doing so violated the law.” As a result, not all such information should automatically be considered classified.

However, regulations in effect when Clinton was secretary of state called for FGI to be marked “confidential” unless it was designated “C/MOD” (for “confidential/modified handling”). But none of Clinton’s emails appear to have been given that designation. (Politico, 5/12/2016)

May 3, 2016: Clinton maintains she and her “representatives” still have not been contacted by the FBI.

Brian Fallon (Credit: MSNBC)

Brian Fallon (Credit: MSNBC)

In an interview conducted on this day by MSNBC, Clinton is asked, “Have you been contacted or have your representatives been contacted” by the FBI to be interviewed as part of their investigation into her email scandal.

Clinton simply replies by saying “No” several times. (MSNBC, 5/3/2016

Two days later, it is reported that Clinton’s former aides were interviewed already, with Huma Abedin having been interviewed one month ago, on April 5, 2016. Furthermore, the FBI is planning to interview Clinton soon. (The Los Angeles Times, 5/5/2016) (Reuters, 5/5/2016)

Reuters will later notice the contradiction and ask Clinton spokesperson Brian Fallon about it. Fallon will cryptically reply, “What does ‘representatives’ mean to you, sir?” (Reuters, 5/5/2016) 

Fallon also calls the FBI investigation an “independent review.” (The Associated Press, 5/4/2016)

May 4, 2016: Guccifer tells Fox News he accessed Clinton’s private server in 2013.

Guccifer (left) talks to Fox News reporter Catherine Herridge (right). (Credit: Fox News)

Guccifer (left) talks to Fox News reporter Catherine Herridge (right). (Credit: Fox News)

The Romanian hacker nicknamed Guccifer, whose real name is Marcel-Lehel Lazar, has been recently interviewed by Fox News. He claims for the first time that after breaking into the email account of Clinton confidant Sid Blumenthal in March 2013, he traced Clinton’s emails back to her private email server.

He tells Fox News, “For me, it was easy […] easy for me, for everybody.” He says he accessed her server “like twice.” He adds, “For example, when Sidney Blumenthal got an email, I checked the email pattern from Hillary Clinton, from Colin Powell, from anyone else to find out the originating IP [Internet Protocol address]. […] When they send a letter, the email header is the originating IP usually…then I scanned with an IP scanner.”

He said he then used some Internet programs to determine if the server was active and which ports were open. However, the server’s contents did “not interest” him at the time. “I was not paying attention. For me, it was not like the Hillary Clinton server, it was like an email server she and others were using with political voting stuff.”

If he breached the server, it appears he didn’t fully understand what he was seeing, and he has not claimed to have uncovered more of Clinton’s emails. He is interviewed from a US prison and has no documents to back up his claim. However, Fox News reports, “While [his] claims cannot be independently verified, three computer security specialists, including two former senior intelligence officials, said the process described is plausible and the Clinton server, now in FBI custody, may have an electronic record that would confirm or disprove Guccifer’s claims.”

Cybersecurity expert Morgan Wright comments, “The Blumenthal account gave him a road map to get to the Clinton server. […] You get a foothold in one system. You get intelligence from that system, and then you start to move.”

Guccifer claims he wants to cooperate with the US government, adding that he has hidden two gigabytes of data that is “too hot” and is “a matter of national security.”

The Clinton campaign responds, “There is absolutely no basis to believe the claims made by this criminal from his prison cell. In addition to the fact he offers no proof to support his claims, his descriptions of Secretary Clinton’s server are inaccurate.” (Fox News, 5/4/2016) 

Politico reports, “An internal FBI review of Clinton’s email records did not indicate traces of hacking” according to “a source familiar with the situation.” (Politico, 5/4/2016)

An FBI report in September 2016 will assert that Guccifer admitted in his FBI interview that he lied about his claim to have accessed Clinton’s server.