June 1, 2016: Clinton wants to avoid answering questions about her email scandal as much as possible.

Politico reports that the State Department inspector general’s report on her email practices has frustrated Clinton’s attempt to focus on her positives, since trustworthiness and honesty issues continue to dodge her. “Clinton’s game plan moving forward is to keep her head down and move the email issue to the side rather than try and explain it all away, while reiterating that what she did was a mistake, [unnamed Clinton] campaign officials said.”

An unnamed “longtime Clinton ally” says: “The strategy of, ‘let’s tell everyone everything about this,’ won’t work now and will just result in more questions. The goal now is how to make this election about something else other than email.”

Another unnamed “Clinton ally close to the campaign” says, “If she starts answering questions [about her email scandal], it becomes Chinese water torture. I think she has said all there is to say on this and needs to put it behind her. If you start to fall into a trap of responding to every little nuance, you lose.” (Politico, 6/1/2016)

June 1, 2016: Fox News reports that the recently released State Department inspector general’s report increases “the likelihood and pressure” that the FBI will pursue criminal charges against Clinton.

This is according to an unnamed “intelligence source familiar with the FBI investigation.” This source says, “It is very harmful to her and increases the likelihood and pressure on [the Department of Justice] to indict. […] [The report] is not evidence in itself, but it clears up confusion [about] Department of State rules and makes the IG [inspector general] a witness, and the people they interviewed, to her computer antics being done without permission.”

The FBI would need to recommend an indictment before the Justice Department would decide to move forward with the case or not.

The source also says that the report “will be useful as rebuttal, potential evidence in 18 USC 1001 charges and establishing aspects of 18 USC 793.” “18 USC 1001” is a reference to a statute known as the “false statements statute.” “Materially false” statements given to a federal officer could result in five years in prison per violation. “18 USC 793” is a reference to a statute which is part of the Espionage Act, and is known as the “gross negligence” statute. (Fox News, 6/1/2016)

June 10, 2016: The media’s focus on Trump lessens coverage about Clinton’s email scandal.

Chuck Todd (Credit: NBC)

Chuck Todd (Credit: NBC)

Meet the Press moderator Chuck Todd says, “You know, ten days ago is when the [State Department] IG [inspector general] report came out on emails. The last ten days could have been about nothing but emails, nothing but negatives about Hillary Clinton. We could be talking about Democratic hand-wringing, but there’s Donald Trump. Enough said.”

Todd is referring to the way Republican presidential candidate Trump’s flamboyant manner and his own controversies dominate news coverage. (The Washington Examiner, 6/10/2016)