May 25, 2016: The New York Times publishes an article with the title: “Emails Add to Hillary Clinton’s Central Problem: Voters Just Don’t Trust Her.”

The article reports that “Clinton has gone from having a 69 percent approval rating and being one of the most popular public figures in the country when she left the State Department in 2013 to having one of the highest disapproval ratings of any likely presidential nominee of a major party.”

According to one recent poll, 53 percent of likely voters said they have an unfavorable opinion of her, and according to another recent poll, 64 percent of registered voters said they do not consider her honest or trustworthy.

The article notes, “Ask voters why they don’t trust Mrs. Clinton, and again and again they will answer with a single word: Emails.” (The New York Times, 5/25/2016)

May 31, 2016: 50 percent think Clinton should continue running for president even if she is indicted.

A Rasmussen Reports poll reveals that 43% of likely US voters think Clinton should stop her presidential campaign if she is charged with a felony as part of her email scandal. But 50% think she should continue her campaign until a court decides on her guilt or innocence. Some 65% consider it likely she broke the law and 30% consider it unlikely; 40% say the scandal makes them less likely to vote for her and 48% say it will have no impact on them. (Rasmussen Reports, 5/31/2016)

June 15, 2016: Two-thirds of US voters think Clinton did something wrong in setting up her personal email address and server.

(Credit: CBS News)

(Credit: CBS News)

According to a CBS News poll, 41 percent think what she did was illegal and another 25 percent think it was improper but not illegal. Only 26 percent of voters say she did nothing wrong. (CBS News, 6/15/2016)

In a November 12, 2015 McClatchy-Marist poll, 28 percent thought she did something illegal and another 40 percent thought it was improper but not illegal, while 27 percent believed she did nothing wrong. (McClatchy Newspapers, 11/12/2015)

July 11, 2016: A majority of Americans think Clinton should be indicted over her emails.

160711ClintonPollABCNews

ABC News / Washington Post graphic of the poll they conducted on July 11, 2016 (Credit: ABC News)

According to an ABC News / Washington Post poll, 56 percent disapprove of FBI Director James Comey’s recommendation not to indict Clinton, while just 35 percent approve. Very similar numbers agree or disagree that this worries them about how she might act if she is elected president.

However, most voters have already made up their minds about her: Only 28 percent say her email controversy makes them less likely to support her, while 10 percent say it makes them more likely to do so.

A large majority of Republicans think she should be indicted and a large majority of Democrats think she shouldn’t. But even about 30 percent of Democrats think she should be indicted, and about 60 percent of independents think so as well. (ABC News, 7/11/2016)

September 8, 2016: The US presidential race is tightening, mainly due to Clinton’s email and Clinton Foundation controversies.

A CNN/ORC poll indicates that Clinton’s email controversy is negatively impacting her chances to defeat Donald Trump in the November 2016 presidential election. Over the past month, she went from having a commanding lead over Trump to a narrow one.

A graphic for the results of a recent poll conducted by CNN and ORC International. (Credit: CNN / ORC)

A chart that indicates the results of a recent poll conducted on September 1 – 4, 2016. (Credit: CNN / ORC)

In March 2015, when reporting on her email controversy began, 46 percent of registered voters agreed with the statement that her use of the server is “an important indicator of her character and ability to serve as president.” That number has risen steadily in other CNN polls to 62 percent in the most recent one.

Sixty percent also say the Clinton Foundation should be shut down either now or if she becomes president. (CNN, 9/9/2016)

The next day, the Washington Post comments on the poll results in an article with the title: “Hillary Clinton’s email server is why this race is still close.” It argues that Trump’s popularity poll numbers make him the most unpopular presidential nominee in modern history. But Clinton’s popularity has declined to be basically as bad as Trump’s. “And the reason is clear: The email story is absolutely killing her — and ruining what might otherwise be a coronation. … [I]f you look closely, perceptions about her email server track closely with her overall image and her perceived honesty and trustworthiness.” (The Washington Post, 9/9/2016)

November 4, 2016: A majority of voters think Clinton acted illegally.

A photo capture from the poll indicates Clinton’s unfavorable ratings are unchanged from September to November, 2016. (Credit: McClatchy-Marist Poll)

Four days before the 2016 US presidential election, a majority of voters believe Clinton has done something illegal with her email controversy and/or Clinton Foundation, according to a McClatchy-Marist Poll. Eighty-three percent of likely voters believe she did something wrong, with 51 percent saying she did something illegal and 32 percent saying she something unethical but not illegal. Only 14 percent say she’s done nothing wrong.

Her main opponent, Republican nominee Donald Trump, has also been beset by scandals and controversies. Seventy-nine percent think Trump did something wrong. Just 26 percent think he’s done something illegal, while 53 percent think he’s done something unethical but not illegal. Only 17 percent think he’s done nothing wrong.

McClatchy Newpapers comments, “The deep suspicion of Clinton is likely a top reason she’s lost much of her lead and the race for the White House has tightened in the race’s closing days.” According to the poll, Clinton is only ahead by one point, 44 percent to 43 percent.

Both candidates are widely disliked. Clinton has an unfavorable rating of 57 percent and Trump has an unfavorable-favorable rating of 61 percent. Both numbers are unprecedented in the history of presidential polling this close to Election Day. (McClatchy Newspapers, 11/4/2016)