April 1, 2005: Sandy Berger pleads guilty to the unlawful removal and retention of national security information.

National Security Advisor Sandy Berger (Credit: Washington Life Magazine)

National Security Advisor Sandy Berger (Credit: Washington Life Magazine)

Former National Security Advisor Berger was caught trying to smuggle classified documents out of the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA). (The Los Angeles Times, 3/27/2016Berger took five copies of a memorandum called the “Millennium Alert After Action Report” and later destroyed three of them. (Real Clear Politics, 1/15/2007(The Washington Post, 4/1/2005)

July 29, 2015: Former Naval Reserve Commander Bryan Nishimura pleads guilty to transferring classified data from a government computer to a personal computer.

150729BryanNishimuraZeroHedge

Bryan Nishimura (Credit: Zero Hedge)

He is sentenced to two years probation and a $7,500 fine. He obtained a large amount of classified data and satellite imagery while serving in Afghanistan in 2007 and then brought it home in 2008. He apparently simply kept the information for himself, as he had a reputation for collecting things. He also destroyed evidence when he was investigated in 2012. (The Sacramento Bee, 7/29/2015)

September 6, 2016: Representative Chaffetz warns the person who managed Clinton’s server could face charges, and he also is puzzled by an assertion of attorney-client privilege.

Paul Combetta (Credit: CSpan)

Paul Combetta (Credit: CSpan)

Representative Jason Chaffetz (R), chair of the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee, writes a letter to Platte River Networks (PRN), the computer company that managed Clinton’s private server since June 2013. Chaffetz warns that one PRN employee, Paul Combetta, could face federal charges for deleting and wiping Clinton’s emails from her server in March 2015. That’s because the House Benghazi Committee had issued a formal order to preserve such records earlier in the month, and Combetta confessed in a later FBI interview that he knew about the order before he made the deletions.

In the letter, Chaffetz says a recent FBI report about the deletions “raises questions to whether [Combetta] violated federal statutes that prohibit destruction of evidence and obstruction of a Congressional investigation.”

Additionally, Combetta took part in conference calls with Clinton’s lawyers just days before and after the deletions, but the FBI was unable to determine what was said in those communications, possibly due to an assertion of attorney-client privilege. In the letter, Chaffetz wants an explanation from PRN how Combetta could refuse to talk to the FBI about the conference calls if the only lawyers involved were Clinton’s. (Salon, 9/6/2016)