April 12, 2015: Hillary Clinton launches her second presidential campaign.

Clinton launches her 2016 presidential campaign with a YouTube video on April 12, 2015. (Credit: CNN)

Clinton launches her 2016 presidential campaign with a YouTube video on April 12, 2015. (Credit: CNN)

She narrowly lost the Democratic nomination to Barack Obama in 2008. Due to her long and prominent political career, she immediately establishes herself as the frontrunner in the race for the Democratic nomination. (The New York Times, 4/13/2015) 

She resigns from the board of directors of the Clinton Foundation on the same day to avoid conflict of interest issues. (Politico, 4/12/2015)

May 11, 2016: FBI Director James Comey says the FBI is conducting an “investigation” into Clinton’s emails and server, not a “security inquiry.”

Speaking to reporters, he adds, “We’re conducting an investigation […] That’s what we do. […] It’s in our name [the Federal Bureau of Investigation]. I’m not familiar with the term ‘security inquiry.’” Clinton and her spokespeople have repeatedly referred to it as a “security inquiry” or a “security referral.”

Comey also says that he feels “pressure” to complete the Clinton investigation soon, but “I don’t tether to any external deadline,” such as the Democratic convention in July 2016. He otherwise deflects questions about the investigation, saying it is on-going. (Politico, 5/11/2016) (The New York Times, 5/11/2016) (The Hill, 5/11/2016) (FBI, 5/14/2016)

May 11, 2016: Vanity Fair publishes an article with the title, “Is Hillary’s Email Nightmare About to Explode?”

The article comments, “While Hillary Clinton is busy trying to put the Democratic primary race behind her and pivot to the general election against presumptive GOP nominee Donald Trump, the past several days have served as a stark reminder that Clinton is not yet clear of a potential scandal that still threatens to derail her campaign: the FBI is nearing the completion of its investigation into her use of a private server to send classified emails, with the results expected be released before November. Negative headlines about Clinton’s e-mails have seemed to be reaching critical mass in recent days.” (Vanity Fair, 5/11/2016)

May 22, 2016: Trump says he’s going to “bigly” emphasize Clinton’s email scandal if he faces her in the general election.

Presumptive Republican nominee Donald Trump indicates he’s planning to emphasize Clinton’s email scandal if Clinton wins the Democratic nomination battle against Senator Bernie Sanders. Trump says that Sanders “didn’t pick up on the emails, which I think was a big mistake. I’m going to pick up bigly. Because frankly she shouldn’t even be allowed to run for president.” (Politico, 5/25/2016)

May 27, 2016: A New York Times article is titled, “Die-Hard Bernie Sanders Backers See FBI as Answer to Their Prayers.”

Supporters at a rally for Bernie Sanders in National City, California, on May 21, 2016. (Credit: Mike Blake / Reuters)

Supporters at a rally for Bernie Sanders in National City, California, on May 21, 2016. (Credit: Mike Blake / Reuters)

The Times reports that a growing number of supporters of Democratic presidential candidate Sanders are “holding out for an 11th-hour miracle: divine deliverance at the hands of the FBI.”

Sanders is down by over 250 pledged delegates in the Democratic primaries with not many states left before the primaries are over, so the hopes of many Sanders supporters are turning to the FBI’s Clinton investigation, which could transform the presidential race. (The New York Times, 5/27/2016)

May 27, 2016—May 29, 2016: Democratic presidential candidate Sanders rethinks his refusal to criticize Clinton over her email scandal.

Cenk Uygur of The Young Turks, interviews Bernie Sanders on May 27, 2016. (Credit: The Young Turks)

Cenk Uygur of The Young Turks, interviews Bernie Sanders on May 27, 2016. (Credit: The Young Turks)

Bernie Sanders is asked if the new State Department inspector general’s report has caused him to rethink his refusal to engage on the issue of Clinton’s email scandal. “It has,” he replies. (Bloomberg News, 5/28/2016) 

Two days later, he adds, “The inspector general just came out with a report, it was not a good report for Secretary Clinton. That is something that the American people, Democrats, and delegates are going to have to take a hard look at.”

He also says that when it comes to superdelegates and the report, “They will be keeping it in mind. I don’t have to tell them that. I mean, everybody in America is keeping it in mind, and certainly the superdelegates are.” (CBS News, 5/29/2016)

June 10, 2016: President Obama officially endorses Clinton in her presidential race.

President Obama endorses Clinton for president on June 10, 2016. (Credit: CNN)

President Obama endorses Clinton for president on June 10, 2016. (Credit: CNN)

The endorsement comes two days after the last major Democratic primaries and after Clinton won a majority of the pledged delegates for the Democratic nomination.

Republicans criticize the move, due to the FBI’s ongoing Clinton investigation. For instance, Senator John Cornyn (R) claims that Obama’s endorsement is a conflict of interest and a special counsel is needed to avoid political pressure on the investigation. (Politico, 6/9/2016)

June 18, 2016: Trump says Sanders is waiting for the FBI to knock Clinton out of the presidential race.

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump notes that Bernie Sanders hasn’t quit the Democratic primary race despite Clinton having a majority of the pledged delegates and even more superdelegates. Trump says, “He’s waiting for the FBI to do what everybody thinks they’re going to do. I think he’s saying, ‘Let’s hang in there because it’s ultimately called the FBI convention. […] We’ll see if the right thing happens.’ Everybody knows what the right thing is.”

Sanders hasn’t made any comment that he’s waiting for the FBI’s decision to recommend Clinton’s indictment or not. (CNN, 6/18/2016)

June 22, 2016: Sanders says “it doesn’t appear” he’s going to be the nominee, but still refuses to concede.

Democratic presidential candidate Bernie Sanders says in an interview, “It doesn’t appear that I’m going to be the nominee, so I’m not going to be determining the scope of the convention.” However, he has yet to formally end his presidential campaign or endorse Clinton. (The Hill, 6/22/2016)