April 4, 2016: Comey says quality comes before speed in the FBI’s Clinton investigation.

FBI Director James Comey at Kenyon College, Ohio, on April 6, 2016. (Credit: Carlos Osorio / The Associated Press)

FBI Director James Comey at Kenyon College, Ohio, on April 6, 2016. (Credit: Carlos Osorio / The Associated Press)

FBI Director James Comey says he does not feel he has to conclude the FBI’s investigation into Clinton’s private server before the Democratic National Convention in July 2016. “The urgency is to do it well and promptly. And ‘well’ comes first.” He won’t reveal any details of the investigation, but says that he is keeping close tabs on it “to make sure we have the resources to do it competently.” (Politico, 4/5/2016)

However, in September 2016, after the investigation has been concluded, Comey will say that he didn’t ask for subpoena power so he could finish the investigation faster.

 

 

May 11, 2016: FBI Director James Comey says the FBI is conducting an “investigation” into Clinton’s emails and server, not a “security inquiry.”

Speaking to reporters, he adds, “We’re conducting an investigation […] That’s what we do. […] It’s in our name [the Federal Bureau of Investigation]. I’m not familiar with the term ‘security inquiry.’” Clinton and her spokespeople have repeatedly referred to it as a “security inquiry” or a “security referral.”

Comey also says that he feels “pressure” to complete the Clinton investigation soon, but “I don’t tether to any external deadline,” such as the Democratic convention in July 2016. He otherwise deflects questions about the investigation, saying it is on-going. (Politico, 5/11/2016) (The New York Times, 5/11/2016) (The Hill, 5/11/2016) (FBI, 5/14/2016)

June 22, 2016: Sanders says “it doesn’t appear” he’s going to be the nominee, but still refuses to concede.

Democratic presidential candidate Bernie Sanders says in an interview, “It doesn’t appear that I’m going to be the nominee, so I’m not going to be determining the scope of the convention.” However, he has yet to formally end his presidential campaign or endorse Clinton. (The Hill, 6/22/2016)

July 11, 2016: Paul Ryan’s attempt to block Clinton from getting intelligence briefings is denied.

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James Clapper (Credit: J. Scott Applewhite / The Associated Press)

A request from Speaker of the House Paul Ryan (R) to prevent Clinton from receiving intelligence briefings after the late July 2016 Democratic National Convention is denied.

Just a few days after Ryan made the request, Director of National Intelligence James Clapper tells Ryan in a letter  that he “does not intend to withhold briefings from any officially nominated, eligible candidate. … Nominees for president and vice president receive these briefings by virtue of their status as candidates, and do not require separate security clearances before the briefings. Briefings for the candidates will be provided on an even-handed non-partisan basis.”

The briefings given both major party candidates are intended to prepare them with the information they’ll need to run the country if they win the general election.

Ryan made the request after FBI Director James Comey said that Clinton and her aides had been “extremely careless” handling highly classified intelligence. Ryan wrote in the request, “There is no legal requirement for you to provide Secretary Clinton with classified information, and it would send the wrong signal to all those charged with safeguarding our nation’s secrets if you choose to provide her access to this information despite the FBI’s findings.” (CNN, 7/11/2016)

July 24, 2016: Debbie Wasserman Schultz, head of the Democratic National Committee (DNC), resigns after a WikiLeaks release of DNC emails.

Wasserman Schultz announces her resignation as chair of the Democratic National Committee on Sunday, July 24, 2016. (Credit: CNN)

Just one day before the Democratic National Convention, Representative Debbie Wasserman Schultz (D) announces she is resigning from her position as the chair of the DNC. This comes in response to WikiLeaks releasing 20,000 leaked emails from a recent hack of the DNC. The New York Times says that the emails “showed party officials conspiring to sabotage the [presidential] campaign of Senator Bernie Sanders of Vermont.”

Earlier in the day, Sanders called the situation an “outrage” and called for Wasserman Schultz to step down. She announced her resignation after a private meeting with Clinton’s senior aides. The Times comments that even prior to the email leak, “Ms. Wasserman Schultz has faced a flurry of negative stories during her five-year tenure as the committee’s chairwoman… but she had resisted calls for her to quit.”

The Times also reports: “The breach of the Democratic committee’s emails… offered undeniable evidence of what Mr. Sanders’s supporters had complained about for much of the senator’s contentious primary contest with Mrs. Clinton: that the party was effectively an arm of Mrs. Clinton’s campaign.”

Donna Brazile, vice chair of the Democratic National Committee (DNC), replaces Wasserman Schultz as interim chair through the end of the November 2016 election. (The New York Times, 7/24/2016)