September 20, 2015: Chuck Todd, Political Director for NBC News, hosts a dinner party for Clinton’s campaign communications director.

Chuck and Kristian Todd arrive for a State Dinner at the White House on October 18, 2016. (Credit: Zach Gibson / Getty Images)

Chuck and Kristian Todd arrive for a State Dinner at the White House on October 18, 2016. (Credit: Zach Gibson / Getty Images)

The political director for NBC News and host of Meet the Press, Chuck Todd, and his wife Kristian Todd, host a dinner party at their home in honor of Clinton’s Campaign Communications Director Jennifer Palmieri and her husband Jim Lyons.

On July 11, 2015, two months after Clinton officially announces her bid for the presidency, Kristian Todd sends an email to Clinton campaign chair John Podesta that includes a link to a paperless invitation for him and his wife Mary.

It is not known what the occasion for the party is. However, most of the other people on the invitation list of less than a dozen are prominent members of the Clinton campaign, such as Jennifer Palmieri and Josh Earnest, or key aides to President Obama, such as Lisa Monaco or Valerie Jarrett.

The party occurs on September 20, 2015.

This email will be released in October 2016. (Wikileaks, 10/17/2016)

 

September 27, 2015: Clinton denies she was trying to hide her email from investigators and the public.

Carrie Johnson (Credit: Doby Photography / NPR)

Carrie Johnson (Credit: Doby Photography / NPR)

Journalist Chuck Todd asks Clinton, “Republicans have been coming after you for years. You might have been running for president in the future. And you wanted to make it a little more difficult for congressional investigators to subpoena your government emails and a little more difficult for Freedom of Information Act [FOIA] requests. Is that it, fair theory or no?”

Clinton replies, “It’s totally ridiculous. That never crossed my mind.”

NPR justice correspondent Carrie Johnson later comments, “[T]here’s a reason she might have decided to answer that way. […] Clinton is talking to two audiences here —voters and investigators. And when it comes to avoiding subpoenas and taking steps to avoid subpoenas, lawyers will tell you there’s an important law Congress passed in 2002 after the Enron scandal. That law makes it a crime to get rid of documents in anticipation of an investigation by the Justice Department or by Congress—a crime called obstruction of justice.” (National Public Radio, 9/30/2015)

September 27, 2015: Clinton claims she did not have any work-related emails regarding the Clinton Foundation while secretary of state.

Clinton on Meet The Press, September 27, 2015. (Credit: NBC)

Clinton on Meet The Press, September 27, 2015. (Credit: NBC)

Clinton is asked by journalist Chuck Todd on Meet The Press about her decision to delete 31,000 emails because they were allegedly personal in nature: “I’m just curious, would anything having to do with the Clinton Foundation, would that have been personal or work?”

Clinton replies, “Well, it would depend. You know, I did not communicate with the foundation. Other people in the State Department did. In accordance with the rules that had been adopted.”

Then Todd asks, “So any of these deleted emails are not going to be foundation-related at all?”

Clinton responds, “Well, they might be, you know, ‘There’s going to be a meeting,’ or, ‘There’s this.’ But not anything that relates to the work of the State Department. That was handled by, you know, the professionals and others in the State Department.” (NBC News, 9/27/2015)

June 10, 2016: The media’s focus on Trump lessens coverage about Clinton’s email scandal.

Chuck Todd (Credit: NBC)

Chuck Todd (Credit: NBC)

Meet the Press moderator Chuck Todd says, “You know, ten days ago is when the [State Department] IG [inspector general] report came out on emails. The last ten days could have been about nothing but emails, nothing but negatives about Hillary Clinton. We could be talking about Democratic hand-wringing, but there’s Donald Trump. Enough said.”

Todd is referring to the way Republican presidential candidate Trump’s flamboyant manner and his own controversies dominate news coverage. (The Washington Examiner, 6/10/2016)