April 23, 2009: Clinton aide Huma Abedin sends Clinton a series of steps the State Department is taking to secure the US embassies in Afghanistan and Pakistan.

The US embassy in Kabul, Afghanistan, in 2010. (Credit: public domain)

The US embassy in Kabul, Afghanistan, in 2010. (Credit: public domain)

Abedin, Clinton’s deputy chief of staff, lists steps that include “increasing the number of hooches, and doubling up staff in lodging.” The email adds more details, for instance, “[W]e need to improve the security perimeter – acquiring property adjacent to our current facilities in Kabul, which is now difficult to secure.” In addition to mentioning information that could benefit attackers of the embassies, the email shows that Clinton was briefed on embassy security issues, despite her claim that she did not directly deal with such matters. (Politico, 10/30/2015)

Summer 2012: A Marine is fired for giving an urgent warning that mentions classified information.

Jason Brezler walks with Afghan children in Afghanistan. (Credit: Corporal Zach Nola)

Jason Brezler walks with Afghan children in Afghanistan. (Credit: Corporal Zach Nola)

Marine Major Jason Brezler sends an email attachment over an unsecure line in an urgent attempt to save the lives of other Marines in Afghanistan. The message is classified, but not marked as such, as Brezler doesn’t know it is classified at the time. The message warns other Marines about the imminent arrival of corrupt Afghan official.

Three weeks later, three Marines will be shot and killed inside a US base by an associate of the official. After finding out that his message contained classified information, Brezler reports this to his superiors. He is later investigated and given an unwanted honorable discharge from the Marines as a result.

The media will later note the similarity between Brezler’s case and Clinton’s. In 2015, the Daily Beast will quote a friend of Brezler’s, who asks him: “Hey, Jason, what did you do that Hillary didn’t?” (The Daily Beast, 8/13/2015)

October 13, 2012: Clinton receives an email that reveals undercover CIA officers use State Department cover in Afghanistan.

Jeremy Bash (left) Leon Panetta (right) (Credits: public domain)

Jeremy Bash (left) Leon Panetta (right) (Credits: public domain)

Jeremy Bash, who is chief of staff to Defense Secretary Leon Panetta at the time, sends an email to four other US officials, including Clinton aides Jake Sullivan and Cheryl Mills. Sullivan then forwards the email to Clinton. The email has the subject heading: “This a.m. Green on Blue.” That is an idiom referring to when police attacks soldiers. The email refers to an Afghan police officer triggering a suicide vest and killing or wounding 14 Americans or Afghans, including one dead American.

The email will later be classified at the “secret” level, suggesting some important classified information in it, but its redactions make it difficult to understand. There is no indication of a reply from Clinton. (US Department of State, 1/29/2016)

In Clinton’s July 2016 FBI interview, she will be specifically asked about this email, again suggesting something unusual about it. However, her answer will also be heavily reacted. For instance, “Clinton believed she would be speculating if she were to state what [redacted] meant when he referred to [redacted].” (Federal Bureau of Investigation, 9/2/2016)

Dario Lorenzetti (public domain)

Dario Lorenzetti (public domain)

On February 4, 2016, NBC News will reveal that the email concerns undercover CIA officer Dario Lorenzetti. He died in the suicide attack described in the email. Lorenzetti’s CIA connection was leaked to the media by anonymous officials four days after his death and was widely reported in the news media, although his CIA cover was not lifted until later.

According to NBC News, in the redacted portions of the email, it seems Bash was trying “to preserve the CIA officer’s cover. But some of the language he used, now that Lorenzetti is known to have been a CIA officer, could be read as a US government acknowledgement that CIA officers pose as State Department personnel in a specific country, Afghanistan — something widely known but not formally admitted.” This is why the email is classified at the “secret” level.

Bash ends the email by instructing a CIA spokesperson to “please lash up with [redacted].” NBC News will indicate the missing word is “presumably either the spy agency or one of its employees.” (NBC News, 2/4/2016)

This may be the phrase that the FBI asked Clinton about, and to which she replied that “she would be speculating if she were to state what [redacted] meant when he referred to [redacted].” (Federal Bureau of Investigation, 9/2/2016)

NBC News will also interview Bash about this email. Bash will claim that the email “did not reference the individual’s name, employer, nor any identifying description or information.” Additionally, once the CIA posthumously lifted Lorenzetti’s cover, “the original unclassified email could be read to confirm the general use of cover, prompting the redactions we now see. But any suggestion that this email contained confirmation about the person or his cover, or any inappropriate information, is flat wrong.” (NBC News, 2/4/2016)

July 29, 2015: Former Naval Reserve Commander Bryan Nishimura pleads guilty to transferring classified data from a government computer to a personal computer.

150729BryanNishimuraZeroHedge

Bryan Nishimura (Credit: Zero Hedge)

He is sentenced to two years probation and a $7,500 fine. He obtained a large amount of classified data and satellite imagery while serving in Afghanistan in 2007 and then brought it home in 2008. He apparently simply kept the information for himself, as he had a reputation for collecting things. He also destroyed evidence when he was investigated in 2012. (The Sacramento Bee, 7/29/2015)