June 17, 2016: Former FBI agents are wondering why the FBI’s Clinton investigation is taking so long.

Edward C. Cosgrove (Credit: Eileen Buckley)

Edward C. Cosgrove (Credit: Eileen Buckley)

Former FBI agent and former district attorney Edward C. Cosgrove says that he has been in contact with other former FBI agents, and “Most former FBI agents cannot understand why the FBI investigation of former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton has not been concluded.”

He wonders why the investigation has gone on for about a year, and yet it “has not been turned over to the attorney general [Loretta Lynch] for her prosecutive judgment.” (The Buffalo News, 6/17/2016)

June 17, 2016: A “deadman’s switch” file increases speculation that WikiLeaks could soon release more Clinton documents.

(A June 17, 2016 WikiLeaks post, including mention of the "deadman's switch" and a "risk insurance" picture. Credit: public domain)

(A June 17, 2016 WikiLeaks post, including mention of the “deadman’s switch” and a “risk insurance” picture. Credit: public domain)

WikiLeaks posts on the Internet an 88-gigabyte encrypted file labeled “WIKILEAKS INSURANCE,” along with the comment, “Protect our coming publications.” This is believed to be a “deadman’s switch,” meaning that unless WikiLeaks personnel are not there to periodically confirm their status, the file will be automatically decrypted, revealing its contents to those who have downloaded it. WikiLeaks have posted several similar files in previous years.

Heavy.com notes that because of recent comments by WikiLeaks head Julian Assange that the organization will soon be publishing more of Clinton’s emails, “many people are wondering if this insurance file is meant to ensure that WikiLeaks can release potentially damaging information about Hillary Clinton.” The file is large enough to contain millions of files if they are all text-based files, but it could include video or other files that take up much more space.

Heavy.com also notes that the reason WikiLeaks doesn’t simply post the files right away is, “The organization often combs through files to redact any sensitive information that might put lives in danger. The INSURANCE file is typically the unredacted version.” (Heavy.com, 6/17/2016)

June 17, 2016: Some cybersecurity experts doubt the Russian government is behind recent hacking attacks.

Nathaniel Gleicher (Credit: Carmen Holt)

Nathaniel Gleicher (Credit: Carmen Holt)

Time Magazine notes that although CrowdStrike, the cybersecurity firm hired by the DNC [Democratic National Committee] to stop the hacking of their computer network, claims the Russian government is behind the attacks, other security experts are skeptical. Someone calling themselves “Guccifer 2.0” has posted some files that appear to come from the DNC hack, and that person claims to be a “lone hacker.”

CrowdStrike asserts this is just an effort to sow confusion about Russian involvement, but some experts doubt that as well.

Nathaniel Gleicher, the former director for cybersecurity policy on the NSC [National Security Council], says, “Attribution is incredibly difficult—I wouldn’t say impossible, but it’s very difficult.”

Reg Harnish, the CEO of the cybersecurity company GreyCastle Security, says the final answer may still be unknown, with political intrigues complicating the picture. “I’ve been personally involved in hundreds of these investigations, and you just don’t end up in the same place where you began. […] I think there’s a lot of misinformation out there right now.”

Scott Borg, the head of the US Cyber Consequences Unit, echoed the skepticism. “Our best guess is that the second (and apparently less skillful) of the two intruders was not Russian intelligence. We are also uncertain about the first group.”

So far, the FBI has not made any comment. (Time, 6/17/2016)