May 31, 2016: A former State Department inspector general says he would not have allowed Clinton’s use of a private server.

Howard Krongard (Credit: Fox News)

Howard Krongard (Credit: Fox News)

Howard Krongard, who was the State Department’s inspector general from 2005 to 2008, says he “would have been stunned had I been asked to send an email to [Clinton] at a personal server, private address. I would have declined to do so on security grounds and if she had sent one to me, I probably would have started an investigation.”

Krongard also suggests that Clinton benefited from the lack of a permanent inspector general for the entire duration of her tenure as secretary of state. “They are the people who enforce the rules, and there was no one enforcing the rules during that time.” (Fox News, 5/31/2016)

May 31, 2016: Clinton says she still does not have an interview scheduled with the FBI.

Chris Hayes (Credit: Showtime)

Chris Hayes (Credit: Showtime)

Journalist Chris Hayes asks Clinton, “I need to ask you if you have been contacted by the FBI about an interview regarding the email situation.” Clinton replies, “No, we do not have an interview scheduled.”

This marks a change from Clinton’s previous answers to such questions, in which she said she hadn’t had any contact with the FBI over the matter. (MSNBC, 5/31/2016)

May 31, 2016: 50 percent think Clinton should continue running for president even if she is indicted.

A Rasmussen Reports poll reveals that 43% of likely US voters think Clinton should stop her presidential campaign if she is charged with a felony as part of her email scandal. But 50% think she should continue her campaign until a court decides on her guilt or innocence. Some 65% consider it likely she broke the law and 30% consider it unlikely; 40% say the scandal makes them less likely to vote for her and 48% say it will have no impact on them. (Rasmussen Reports, 5/31/2016)