May 5, 2016: Some of Clinton’s emails may remain private because of a legal precedent involving former Secretary of State Henry Kissinger.

US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton (R) and former US Secretary of State Henry Kissinger participate in "Conversations on Diplomacy, Moderated by Charlie Rose,” at the Department of State in Washington, DC, on April 20, 2011. AFP Photo/Jewel Samad (Photo credit should read JEWEL SAMAD/AFP/Getty Images)

Clinton and Henry Kissinger in Washington, DC, on April 20, 2011. (Credit: Jewel  Samad/AFP/Getty Images)

Kissinger made transcripts of some of his work-related phone calls. After he left office in January 1977, he took the only copies with him and eventually had them transferred to the Library of Congress, with tight restrictions on who could access them. A watchdog group sued for access, but the US Supreme Court ruled in a five-to-two decision that the State Department had no obligation to search for documents that had been removed, even if they had been improperly taken.

However, there is a footnote written by Justice William Rehnquist that the ruling might not apply when someone is actively trying to thwart the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA).

In two ongoing civil suits, judges have granted discovery to Judicial Watch in part to determine if Clinton or her aides had actively tried to thwart FOIA. That opens the possibility of a judge eventually ordering Clinton to hand over even the emails she deemed personal, if she still has them. (Time, 5/5/2016)

May 5, 2016: The FBI is planning to interview Clinton soon.

Former US Attorney Matthew Whitaker (Credit: public domain)

Former US Attorney Matthew Whitaker (Credit: public domain)

It is reported that the FBI is likely to interview Clinton in “the next few weeks.” Clinton’s top aides have been interviewed in recent weeks and it appears Clinton will be interviewed last, at the very end of the FBI’s investigation. (Reuters, 5/5/2016) 

Former federal prosecutor Steven Levin says, “This certainly sends the signal that they are nearing an end to their investigation.” And while the FBI has not said that Clinton is the main target of their investigation, Levin notes that, “Typically, the way we structured investigations when I was a federal prosecutor is that we would seek to interview the target last.”

Former US attorney Matthew Whitaker says the FBI will only “ask her questions that they know the answers to already.” Their aim is to get her to confess to a crime, or to lie, which also would be a crime. (The Hill, 5/8/2016)

May 5, 2016: The State Department may postpone releasing documents about Clinton’s email security procedures until after the November 2016 presidential election.

Jason Koebler (Credit: Vice News)

Jason Koebler (Credit: Vice News)

In March 2015, shortly after Clinton’s exclusive use of a private email and server was first publicly revealed, Vice News filed a Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) request with the State Department for all “communications, presentations, and procedures created by the State Department to secure Hillary Clinton’s email from electronic threats.” In 2015, the Department began releasing some relevant emails, but no other relevant documents have been released.

After two delays, on this day, Vice News is told by the Department that the “estimated completion date” for the FOIA request has been “extended to December 2016.”

Vice News reporter Jason Koebler comments, “The FOIA process is a notorious mess, but it is patently ridiculous that records pertaining to the security practices of someone who stands a very good chance of running the country—and thus being in possession of highly sensitive documents at all times—won’t be made available to the public a year and a half after they were requested.” (Vice News, 5/5/2016)

May 5, 2016: It is reported that some of Clinton’s aides have recently been interviewed by the FBI as part of their Clinton email investigation.

CNN reports that “In recent weeks, multiple aides have been interviewed—some more than once,” according to unnamed US officials. Only Clinton’s former deputy chief of staff Huma Abedin is mentioned by name, who was interviewed at least once, on April 5, 2016. The FBI “has been quietly bringing witnesses into an FBI office without drawing attention.” They are likely to try to do the same when Clinton herself gets interviewed in the coming weeks. (CNN, 5/5/2016) (The Los Angeles Times, 5/5/2016)

May 5, 2016: CNN alleges the FBI has not proven that Clinton “willfully” broke the law; the investigation could conclude within weeks.

CNN reports, “The investigation is still ongoing, but so far investigators haven’t found evidence to prove that Clinton willfully violated the law the US officials say.” However, nothing has been said about crimes that did not involve willful violation of the law, such as gross negligence, or unsecure possession of classified material.

Unnamed officials also claim that “The probe remains focused on the security of the server and the handling of classified information and hasn’t expanded to other matters.”

Furthermore, “FBI officials overseeing the probe now expect to complete their work in the next few weeks and then turn over the findings to the Justice Department, which will make a final decision on whether to bring charges against anyone.” (CNN, 5/5/2016)

May 5, 2016: Accounts differ on the results of the FBI’s Clinton investigation so far.

The Washington Post reports, “Prosecutors and FBI agents investigating Hillary Clinton’s use of a personal email server have so far found scant evidence that the leading Democratic presidential candidate intended to break classification rules, though they are still probing the case aggressively with an eye on interviewing Clinton herself, according to US officials familiar with the matter.” Additionally, “One official said prosecutors are wrestling with the question of whether Clinton intended to violate the rules, and so far, the evidence seemed to indicate she did not.” (The Washington Post, 5/5/2016)

However, a few hours later, NBC News cites unnamed US officials who have a different point of view. “As for where the investigation stands, these officials say it is a long way from over. […] No conclusions have been reached about whether any laws were violated in setting up or using the system, the officials say.” (NBC News, 5/5/2016)

May 5, 2016: “Rocket docket” prosecutors are working with the FBI on the Clinton investigation.

Federal Prosecutor Dana Boente (Credit: public domain

Federal Prosecutor Dana Boente (Credit: public domain

It is reported that FBI investigators looking into Clinton’s email scandal have been joined by prosecutors from the US Attorney’s Office in the Eastern District of Virginia. The district is commonly nicknamed the “rocket docket” for the speed with which cases move through it. It is home to the CIA and the Pentagon, so it often deals with national security and terrorism cases. The office is led by veteran federal prosecutor Dana Boente. Prosecutors from the office have been working with the FBI to interview Clinton’s top aides. (The Washington Post, 5/5/2016)

May 5, 2016: 36 more Clinton emails are publicly released, suggesting many more still to come.

In January 2016, a federal judge ordered the State Department to release all the known emails of Huma Abedin from her time as Clinton’s deputy chief of staff. This is in response to a Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) lawsuit by Judicial Watch.

Over 29,000 pages of emails are due to be released in batches, and this is the first batch of 241 pages. Some of the emails are between Abedin and Clinton, and most if not all of them appear to be work-related, showing yet again that Clinton did not turn over all her work-related emails when she gave the State Department over 30,000 emails in December 2014.

21 of the emails between Abedin and Clinton date from January 28, 2009 to March 17, 2009; Clinton had said she didn’t use her new email account until March 18, 2009.

Another 15 emails between them date between March 18, 2009 to October 20, 2012, and do not match any of emails in the State Department’s database of the 30,000 publicly released Clinton emails. Whereas 16 emails dating from March 20, 2009 to May 28, 2009 do appear in that database. (Judicial Watch, 5/5/2016) (US Department of State, 5/1/2016) (US Department of State, 5/1/2016) 

Judicial Watch President Tom Fitton comments, “These emails further undermine Hillary Clinton’s statement, under penalty of perjury, suggesting she turned over all of her government emails to the State Department. How many more Hillary Clinton emails is the Obama State Department hiding?” (Judicial Watch, 5/5/2016) Since these emails appear to be:

  • a more or less random selection from all four years of Clinton’s time as secretary of state
  • about half of the emails from March 18, 2009 and afterwards are not included in the 30,000 previously released emails
  • this batch makes up less than one percent of all the Huma Abedin emails due to be released
  • Abedin’s emails make up only about 15 percent of the 30,000 emails

One can reasonably estimate that thousands of the over 31,000 emails Clinton deleted actually are work-related and are likely to be publicly released in later batch releases of Abedin’s emails as well as FOIA lawsuits forcing the release of emails from other top Clinton aides. In fact, if this sample is a truly random sample representative of the rest of the emails from Abedin and other top Clinton aides, well over 10,000 of Clinton’s deleted emails could be work-related.