October 13, 2015: The White House backtracks on President Obama’s comments about Clinton’s email scandal.

Josh Earnest (Credit: Politico)

Josh Earnest (Credit: Politico)

Obama asserted that while Clinton’s use of a private email server was a “mistake,” he doesn’t “think it posed a national security problem.” White House press secretary Josh Earnest says that Obama’s comments were made “based on what we publicly know now.” Earnest adds that those comments “certainly [were] not an attempt, in any way, to undermine the importance or independence of the ongoing FBI investigation.” (CNN, 10/13/2015

Despite the backtracking, Obama will make very similar comments in April 2016. (MSNBC, 4/10/2016)

October 13, 2015: Clinton’s private server was especially vulnerable to hacker attacks.

Clinton checks her phone at the United Nations Security Council on March 12, 2012. (Credit: Richard Drew / The Associated Press)

Clinton checks her phone at the United Nations Security Council on March 12, 2012. (Credit: Richard Drew / The Associated Press)

The Associated Press reports that “The private email server running in [Clinton’s] home basement when she was secretary of state was connected to the Internet in ways that made it more vulnerable to hackers, according to data and documents reviewed by the Associated Press. […] Experts said the Microsoft remote desktop service [used on the server] wasn’t intended for such use without additional protective measures, and was the subject of US government and industry warnings at the time over attacks from even low-skilled intruders.” (The Associated Press, 10/13/2015) 

One anonymous senior National Security Agency (NSA) official comments after reading the Associated Press report, “Were they drunk? Anybody could have been inside that server—anybody.” (The New York Observer, 10/19/2015)

October 13, 2015: Sanders says he’s sick of hearing about Clinton’s “damn emails.”

Senator Bernie Sanders and Hillary Clinton shake hands moments after his "damn emails" comment during the first Democratic primary debate. (Credit: Reuters)

Senator Bernie Sanders and Hillary Clinton shake hands moments after his “damn emails” comment during the first Democratic primary debate. (Credit: Reuters)

In the first Democratic primary debate, Senator Bernie Sanders, Clinton’s main rival for the Democratic nomination, addresses Clinton’s email scandal. “Let me say this. Let me say something that may not be great politics. But I think the secretary is right. And that is that the American people are sick and tired of hearing about your damn emails!”

Clinton responds, “Thank you. Me too. Me too.” Then the two of them shake hands.

According to the Los Angeles Times: “The crowd went wild. So did the Internet.” (The Los Angeles Times, 10/13/2015

Sanders will continue to avoid criticizing Clinton about her emails in the months that follow. Some of Sanders’ allies are disappointed that he doesn’t frequently attack Clinton on the issue. Former Senator Bob Kerrey (D), a Clinton supporter, will later say, “The email story is not about emails. It is about wanting to avoid the reach of citizens using FOIA”—the Freedom of Information Act—“to find out what their government is doing, and then not telling the truth about why she did.” (The New York Times, 4/3/2016)